Last edited by Voodoogal
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land found in the catalog.

The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land

In Pursuit of the Legend

by Julie Carr

  • 258 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Melbourne University Publishing .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Australasian & Pacific history: c 1750 to c 1900,
  • Australasian & Pacific history: from c 1900 -,
  • Indigenous peoples,
  • History,
  • History: World,
  • Australia,
  • Australia & New Zealand - General

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages256
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7768360M
    ISBN 10052284930X
    ISBN 109780522849301

    In her book The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land, author Julie Carr recounted a story written in by Mary Howitt, the daughter of A.W. Howitt, an anthropologist and Gippsland magistrate, which told how the white woman later had children with an Aboriginal husband and drowned in . The natives had revered this object and carried it about with them. This led many to believe that reports by natives of a white woman in Gippsland were referring to this. There was a report that the bodies of a white woman and child were found on 29 October beside one of the Gippsland Lakes at a place called Jemmy's Bank.

    Some believe the White Woman of Gippsland story was used to justify the killings of many of the Gunaikurnai people. Massacres occurred at Nuntin, Boney Point, Butchers Creek, Warrigal Creek, Maffra and at other unspecified locations throughout Gippsland. The white woman of Gippsland remains one of Gippslands mysteries to this day.5/5(1). Once again taking history as his cue, Davison recounts the nineteenth-century search for the infamous "white woman" of Gippsland, Victoria - a British woman, presumably the survivor of a shipwreck, who was "taken captive" by an Aboriginal tribe and supposedly subjected to all kinds of heinous indignities at the hands of the "savages".5/5(1).

      The second source of captivity narratives come from the Great Plains and the southwest, during western settlement in the s. Think, Cynthia Ann Parker taken and adopted by Comanche or, Olive Oatman the White woman famous for her tribal chin tattoo. In the Eastern Woodlands, women and girls taken as captives were often just held for ransom. Perhaps the biggest story to come out of Gippsland in the s was the search for a lost white women said to have been held captive by some Gunaikurnai people. Local legend has it that in the s, a young woman, the sole survivor of a shipwreck off the nearby Ninety Mile Beach was taken and held captive by the local tribe of Bratwoloong, who.


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The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land by Julie Carr Download PDF EPUB FB2

The White Woman is not an historical novel, but it evokes the period of early European settlement to tell the story of the mysterious White Woman said to have been held captive by the Kurnai People of Gippsland in the s/5.

Summary During the s, in the fledgling settlement of Port Phillip, a rumour arose that a white woman was being held captive by Aborigines in the Gipps Land bush. This book explores contemporary concerns about Australian identity and black-white relationships, and provides a valuable case study of "settler society".

Taylor, R, Book review of 'The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land: In pursuit of the legend', Journal of Australian Colonial History, 4, (1) ISSN () [Review Single Work]Author: R Taylor. The captive white woman of Gipps Land: in pursuit of the legend.

[Julie E Carr] -- "In the s, in the fledgling settlement of Port Phillip, a rumour persisted that a white woman was being held captive by Aborigines in the Gipps Land bush.". notes ) Abstract The author 'examines the legend of the White Woman of Gipps land (later Gippsland), allegedly held captive by Aborigines, and the expeditions to rescue her.'.

Liam Davison's novel The White Woman is the most recent manifestation of its enduring power and interest. The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land is the first major study of the White Woman legend. Taylor, R, Book review of 'The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land: In pursuit of the legend', Journal of Australian Colonial History, 4, (1) ISSN () [Review Single Work] Identifier.

oai: THE CAPTIVE WHITE Woman of Gipps Land: In Pursuit of the Legend:Julie Carr New - $ Fishpond Australia, The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land: In Pursuit of the Legend by JulieCarrBuy. Books online: The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land: In Pursuit of the Legend,(5).

In her book  The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land  author Julie Carr recounted a story written in by Mary Howitt, the daughter of  A.W. Howitt, an anthropologist and Gippsland magistrate, which told how the white woman later had children with an Aboriginal husband and drowned in  McLennan’s strait.

This frontier story of a captive white woman was to spawn an enduring legend which has persisted in Gippsland histories, fictional versions, poetry and illustrations for over years.

The legend's endurance and emergence at regular intervals throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries indicate its ongoing role in white post-settlement mythology. In her book The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land author Julie Carr recounted a story written in by Mary Howitt, the daughter of A.W.

Howitt. Chapter Twelve. The Lot of Two White Captives. and after binding their captive upon the back of one of their ponies and being joined by the others of the party, began their flight from the settlements, well knowing that the alarm would soon be given, and pursuit by the enraged settlers would be the result.

Like most Indian women, she. The lost white woman of Western Australia found in Gippsland. Late last year a book collector asked what I knew of a white girl captured by the W.A. natives, and referred me to The Adventures of a Seventeen-year-old Lad by John Grandison Williams, published in Boston in The belief that there was a captive white woman originated with a newspaper account of an encounter of Angus McMillan and his party with an Aboriginal encamp- ment in Gippsland.

Jenny Wiley, Captive White Woman Denise Smith has researched the story of Jenny Wiley, a white woman who was captured and held by the Shawnee Indians.

How long Jenny was held and what happened is a story that has many versions. The Captive White Woman of Gipps Land: In Pursuit of the Legend.

avg rating — 5 ratings — published /5. Captive White Woman – Assault on Aborigines During the year ofmore than fifty Aborigines were killed during the search for a white woman supposedly held by the Aborigines. There had been many reported sightings of a white woman and ‘half-cast’ children amidst the.

The book opens with Belinda, trapped by her friend’s husband, toiling to paddle his boat and be his sex slave, before the story moves on to the other white captives.

Each of the women featured in this book were once proud ladies with responsibilities and possessions; each has now been reduced to the status of a mere possession, to be used and Author: Peter Marriner.

Although her existence still remains a mystery, the captive white woman legend became deeply intertwined with the 19th century history of Gippsland -- and the story offers an insight into the.

White Women Captives in North Africa: Narratives of Enslavement, th Edition Captive in Iran: A Remarkable True Story of Hope and Triumph amid the Horror of Tehran's Brutal Evin Prison Maryam Rostampour.

out of 5 stars Kindle by: 5.The white woman of Gippsland, or the captive woman of Gippsland, was supposedly a European woman rumoured to have been held against her will by Aboriginal people in the Gippsland region of Australia in the s.

Liam Patrick Davison (29 July – .Darian-Smith, K, The White Woman of Gippsland: A Frontier Myth, Captive lives: Australian captivity narratives, University of London, K Darian-Smith, R Poignant and K Schaffer (ed), London, pp.

Cited by: 2.